Views: 143, Date:26/Jul/2016


Top takeaways from day 1 of the Democratic convention


PHILADELPHIA — Democrats proved Monday that they can be as dysfunctional as Republicans, which is fun for those of us who cover political dysfunction for a living.

Here are some takeaways from the first day of the Democratic convention, which began only after host Debbie Wasserman Schultz was essentially disinvited:

One thing was clear Monday: Bernie Sanders' supporters are nowhere near ready to kiss and make up with a Democratic Party that they feel worked against their candidate and their movement, especially after recently released party emails by Wikileaks further confirmed in their view.

Bernie backers booed lustily as the platform and rules were adopted, chanting over even the opening invocation, and for the first hour or so of the proceedings, booed every mention of Hillary Clinton's name.

Even Elizabeth Warren was heckled later by a few disgruntled convention-goers over her prime-time speech in support of Clinton. "We trusted you!" they shouted.

Many Sanders delegates acknowledged off the floor that they would likely end up voting for Clinton because they REALLY don't like Donald Trump. But it was also clear that Clinton has a ways to go to make these people into something more that reluctant supporters.

Texas delegate Barbara Fetonte said, "She needs to show in her actions that she wants us and right now she really hasn’t done that." And while Sanders has said his supporters should back Clinton, "Bernie can’t just say it and it happens. I love Bernie and I respect the hell out of him, but it’s hard.”

The Progressive Party

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and comedian Sarah Silverman

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and comedian Sarah Silverman speak during the Democratic National Convention on July 25, 2016. (Photo: Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY)

 

There are obviously still fences to mend (see above), but the message Democrats aimed to send on the first night of their convention was clear: The party's leading liberals are firmly behind Clinton.

There was Minnesota Sen. Al Franken doing what amounted to a stand-up routine, both by himself and later with comedienne Sarah Silverman, eviscerating Trump on everything from Trump University to Trump steaks.

There was Warren, the Massachusetts senator and hero of the left who withheld her endorsement of Clinton until June, blasting away at Trump, which has become her favorite past-time on Twitter. She took aim at his "stupid wall," Trump University and for saying "he was excited for the 2008 housing crash."

One thing was clear Monday: Bernie Sanders' supporters are nowhere near ready to kiss and make up with a Democratic Party that they feel worked against their candidate and their movement, especially after recently released party emails by Wikileaks further confirmed in their view.

Bernie backers booed lustily as the platform and rules were adopted, chanting over even the opening invocation, and for the first hour or so of the proceedings, booed every mention of Hillary Clinton's name.

Even Elizabeth Warren was heckled later by a few disgruntled convention-goers over her prime-time speech in support of Clinton. "We trusted you!" they shouted.

Many Sanders delegates acknowledged off the floor that they would likely end up voting for Clinton because they REALLY don't like Donald Trump. But it was also clear that Clinton has a ways to go to make these people into something more that reluctant supporters.

Texas delegate Barbara Fetonte said, "She needs to show in her actions that she wants us and right now she really hasn’t done that." And while Sanders has said his supporters should back Clinton, "Bernie can’t just say it and it happens. I love Bernie and I respect the hell out of him, but it’s hard.”

The Progressive Party

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and comedian Sarah Silverman

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and comedian Sarah Silverman speak during the Democratic National Convention on July 25, 2016. (Photo: Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY)

 

There are obviously still fences to mend (see above), but the message Democrats aimed to send on the first night of their convention was clear: The party's leading liberals are firmly behind Clinton.

There was Minnesota Sen. Al Franken doing what amounted to a stand-up routine, both by himself and later with comedienne Sarah Silverman, eviscerating Trump on everything from Trump University to Trump steaks.

There was Warren, the Massachusetts senator and hero of the left who withheld her endorsement of Clinton until June, blasting away at Trump, which has become her favorite past-time on Twitter. She took aim at his "stupid wall," Trump University and for saying "he was excited for the 2008 housing crash."

Source USA today.com

 






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